In a room that formerly served as a patient consultation area, Smart Dental hygienist Sarah Seng dons personal protective equipment before meeting with a patient. Dentists in Madison and elsewhere say they are taking many steps to reduce the spread of COVID-19. John Hart / Wisconsin State Journal
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Claire DeRosa / Wisconsin Watch

Wisconsin Watch is a nonprofit newsroom that focuses on government integrity and quality of life issues, and we always provide our news for free.

You can read all of our coronavirus/COVID-19 coverage by signing up for our Wisconsin COVID-19 Update newsletter, and please consider becoming a member to support our nonprofit journalism. 

Today we highlight our latest examination of frustrations for Wisconsinites with disabilities who are seeking jobless benefits.

Bram Sable-Smith, of WPR and Wisconsin Watch, previously reported on a 2013 Wisconsin law that state officials said prevented laid-off workers receiving Social Security Disability Insurance from getting state unemployment insurance. The state was denying them federal pandemic aid too, citing reasoning that some unemployment law experts criticized. The state reversed that policy last month, but many remain in limbo. One northern Wisconsin woman finally retroactively received six month of benefits, but only after a four-month wait — capped by two weeks of phone calls, technology glitches and 32 emails to agency administrators.

See our full coverage of Wisconsin’s struggles to deliver on unemployment during the pandemic here.

Top Stories

In a room that formerly served as a patient consultation area, Smart Dental hygienist Sarah Seng dons personal protective equipment before meeting with a patient. Dentists in Madison and elsewhere say they are taking many steps to reduce the spread of COVID-19. John Hart / Wisconsin State Journal

Wisconsinites with disabilities see long wait for jobless aid, even after gaining eligibilityWisconsin Watch/WPR 

Spike in COVID-19 cases at Wisconsin veterans home spurs request for federal aidWPR 

No vaccine mandate. No jail time. Here’s what Sheboygan Co.’s proposed public health ordinance really entails.Sheboygan Press

Most COVID-19 patients in Wisconsin have recovered, but what does that mean?WisContext

Dentists alter procedures as oral care resumes during COVID-19Wisconsin State Journal 

Wisconsin removed from Chicago quarantine order after drop in daily casesMilwaukee Journal Sentinel 

AP survey: States uncommitted to Trump’s unemployment boostAssociated Press 

How COVID-19 will change school busingJanesville Gazette

What are we missing? And how are you coping? Help us provide critical information and accountability by filling out this form or emailing us at tips@wisconsinwatch.org.

Quotable

“I’m sad that school is starting online this year. Being able to go to school and see my friends was one of my favorite parts of school, and now I won’t be able to see them in my classes, which is pretty upsetting. It’s also harder to ask teachers questions and for them to explain through the screen. I personally learn better when it’s being shown to me in person,”

Celia Rivera, sophomore at Pius XI Catholic High School in Milwaukee, speaking to Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

“I think it’s better virtual, because if we go to school it will be hard for teachers to keep us socially distanced from each other.”

Kimahry Rosa Rodriguez, a student at Escuela Vieau School in Milwaukee, also quoted by Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

Data to note

Here are the latest visualizations of COVID-19 cases and deaths from our partners at WisContext.

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Resilient Wisconsin

People helping others and showing resilience during this time of anxiety. Send suggestions by tagging us on social media — @wisconsinwatch — or emailing us: tips@wisconsinwatch.org.

Record July home sales in Wisconsin follow record declines just months beforeWPR 

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The nonprofit Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism (wisconsinwatch.org) collaborates with Wisconsin Public Radio, PBS Wisconsin, other news media and the UW-Madison School of Journalism and Mass Communication. All works created, published, posted or disseminated by the Center do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of UW-Madison or any of its affiliates.

The byline "Wisconsin Watch" represents members of the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism's editorial and public engagement and marketing staff.