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Posted inFailure at the Faucet, Government, Health & Welfare, Water Watch Wisconsin

Lead pipes, antiquated law threaten Wisconsin’s drinking water quality

Experts, and even some regulators, say existing laws are failing to protect Wisconsin and the nation from harmful exposure to lead in drinking water that leaches from aging plumbing — a danger illustrated by the public health crisis in Flint, Michigan.

Posted inEnvironment, Government, Water Watch Wisconsin

Gov. Scott Walker’s science cuts may hinder efforts to halt walleye decline

Wisconsin’s walleye have been in decline for as long as scientists have been collecting solid data, about a quarter-century. They aren’t as plentiful, and they’re growing more slowly. Now the state Department of Natural Resources’ ability to research and reverse that decline could be at risk, with Gov. Scott Walker’s proposed cuts of DNR scientists.

Posted inEnvironment, Government, Scott Walker's Wisconsin, Water Watch Wisconsin

Layoffs at Wisconsin DNR would trigger terminations of limited-term employees

A state law requires that before the DNR can lay off a single permanent staffer, it must let go any limited-term employees or probationary employees with the same job classification. According to numbers DNR furnished the Legislative Fiscal Bureau in early May, the science bureau has 95 LTEs.

Posted inEnvironment, Government, Health & Welfare

U.S. Rep. Reid Ribble convenes dairies, DNR to discuss Green Bay phosphorus pollution

Phosphorus flowing into the bay causes fish kills, toxic algae blooms and an annual dead zone. “I felt it was important to bring the stakeholders together, and see if we could maybe stop pointing fingers at each other, and start pointing fingers at solutions,” Rep. Ribble said about the April 1 event he’s hosting.

Posted inMoney & Politics Column

Deer disease keeps worsening in Wisconsin, as predicted

Thirteen years after CWD was first discovered in Wisconsin, a state wildlife expert says many hunters “just want things to go back to normal.” That’s not likely to happen. A far more plausible scenario is that the disease will continue to spread, infecting and killing deer, until the number of animals available for hunters is seriously depleted.