During the public hearing on the lame-duck bills Dec. 3, at the Wisconsin State Capitol in Madison, members of the public bang on the doors and chant to be let into the hearing room. Police secured the doors, trying to control the crowd. This photo won an award from the Milwaukee Press Club for Best News Photograph. Emily Hamer / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism
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More photo essays from WisWatch

Wisconsin’s
frenetic lame duck session

Spending election night with Scott Walker supporters, as elation turns to dismay

It’s been a busy year for journalism, and while our reporters have covered stories around the state, they’ve also taken cameras along to document the people, places and stories of Wisconsin that mean the most to our readers.

Here’s a glimpse at some of our best photojournalism from 2018. We also have a lot more great work in the pipeline for 2019, so stay tuned for more of our award-winning journalism in the year to come!

Scott Walker blows a kiss to the crowd during the State of the State address at the Wisconsin State Capitol in Madison on Jan. 24. Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism
Students and others rally against gun violence as they march to the Wisconsin State Capitol on March 14. The rally was followed by speeches on the steps and chanting inside the Capitol as protesters tried to get the attention of legislators. Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism
Julie Routhieaux, administrative specialist for the village of Little Chute, Wis., climbs into the DS200 scanner and tabulator voting machine to clear a paper jam caused by a stuck absentee ballot. Also seen are Rita Mollen, chief election inspector, left, Municipal Clerk Laurie Decker, center, and Deborah Hermsen, election-chief-in-training, right. Decker said that the paper jam, or the act of clearing it, had no effect on election security. Related story: Voting systems in Wisconsin, a key swing state, can be hacked, security experts warn Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism
Eve Clark, 10, is nuzzled by a calf during feeding time at Vision-Aire Farms. Also pictured is her cousin, Addison Grade, 7. Eve, along with her siblings and cousins, regularly take care of the animals and other chores around the farm. Photo shot on assignment for NPR. Related story: For Wisconsin’s Dairy Farmers, Tariffs Could Reshape The Race For The Senate Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism
A Latino employee who asked not to be named takes a break from mopping the floor at a Chinese restaurant in Waukegan, Ill. He says managers treat the employees well and offer them a decent place to stay, but do not pay workers overtime or the minimum wage. Related story: Asian restaurants and Chicago employment agencies accused of exploiting Latino workers in Midwest Alexandria Arriaga / Chicago Sun-Times
Tony Megna is a former UW-Badger linebacker who quit playing football after his sophomore season due to debilitating headaches he says were caused by repeated concussions. He is now the owner of Integrated Heights Healing and Wellness Center in Mt. Pleasant, Wis. He credits acupuncture, massage and traditional Eastern medicine as being critical to his recovery. Here he demonstrates his techniques on Connery Flannery, 24, a semi-pro receiver and quarterback with the Racine Raiders on March 16. Related story: Former Badger plans legal action; says he ‘wasn’t aware of brain injury’ risk Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism
A group of citizens gathers at the Wisconsin State Capitol on March 13, to protest the inclusion of a $350 million prison on a bill that would have made unrelated changes to probation and parole. The prison measure was added after the public hearing and would have resulted in the first new prison in Wisconsin in 17 years. The Senate declined to take up the bill. Related story: Last-minute surprises and secretive moves hide Wisconsin lawmakers’ actions from public view Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism
Robert Rolley, a retired Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources wildlife research biologist, says he has seen regular citizens lose influence over natural resource decisions. He is seen here at his home in Baraboo, Wis., on May 21. “There is a long history in the DNR of listening to public input prior to making management decisions,” says Rolley, who worked at the agency for 25 years. “What has changed is which citizens the DNR Board and administration is interested in listening to.” Related story: Wisconsin residents see democracy decline, reflecting national discontent with government Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism
Evan Barczynski, 25, watches early election results at the Scott Walker watch party at the Ingleside Hotel in Pewaukee, Wis. on Nov. 6. “I’m voting for the side I believe stands with God. I’m pro-life, It’s about the babies.” Related photo essay: Spending election night with Scott Walker supporters, as elation turns to dismay Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism
Protesters gather on the Capitol steps to oppose bills that would restrict early voting and limit the powers of Attorney General-elect Josh Kaul and Governor-elect Tony Evers. During the Dec. 3 protest, the Joint Finance Committee heard public testimony against the bills in a hearing inside the Capitol. Related photo essay: Wisconsin’s frenetic lame duck session Emily Hamer / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism

The nonprofit Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism (www.WisconsinWatch.org) collaborates with Wisconsin Public Radio, Wisconsin Public Television, other news media and the UW-Madison School of Journalism and Mass Communication. All works created, published, posted or disseminated by the Center do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of UW-Madison or any of its affiliates.

Republish our articles for free, online or in print, under a Creative Commons license.

Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch

Coburn Dukehart joined the Center in 2016 as digital and multimedia director. Her role includes directing the Center’s visual strategy, creating visual and audio content, managing digital assets and training student and professional journalists.

Dukehart previously was a senior photo editor at National Geographic, the picture and multimedia editor at NPR, a photo editor at USATODAY.com and washingtonpost.com, interned in the White House photo department, and worked for a London-based publishing group. She has received awards from the National Press Photographers Association, Pictures of the Year International and the White House News Photographers Association. Her multimedia and photography work has been honored with a Webby, a Gracie, a Murrow, a duPont, and Milwaukee Press Club awards, and she was nominated for a national Emmy. Dukehart received a bachelor’s degree in journalism and English from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She holds a master’s degree in photojournalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia.