Governor Tony Evers greets legislators prior to his second State of the State address in Madison, Wis., at the State Capitol building on Jan. 22, 2020. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
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As Gov. Tony Evers delivered his second State of the State address to lawmakers Wednesday, I positioned myself to the right of the Democrat’s podium, squeezing between a television camera and a cold marble wall.

Most members of the press arrived a few hours before the 7 p.m. speech to claim a perch. Mine offered a side view of the governor and a front-row view of the Legislature. Once there, I could not move for the duration of the speech in which Evers proposed to aid struggling dairy farmers and create a commission to redraw political maps free of gerrymandering.

As members of the Assembly and Senate entered the room, many hugged or shook hands with State Treasurer Sarah Godlewski, Attorney General Josh Kaul and State Superintendent Carolyn Stanford Taylor. They sat about eight inches in front of me. Republicans and Democrats hugged and glad-handed across the aisle at a time when they are struggling to find common ground in addressing Wisconsin’s biggest challenges.

I looked for moments that captured the spirit of the pomp and circumstance of the event and any camaraderie between all those lawmakers gathered in one place.

Here is what I saw.

Attorney General Josh Kaul is seen with State Treasurer Sarah Godlewski and State Superintendent Carolyn Stanford Taylor before Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers delivered his second State of the State address on Jan. 22, 2020 at the State Capitol in Madison, Wis. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Brian Hagedorn is seen before Gov. Tony Evers delivered his second State of the State address on Jan. 22, 2020 at the State Capitol in Madison, Wis. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes hugs State Treasurer Sarah Godlewski, while State Superintendent Carolyn Stanford Taylor looks on. They are seen before Gov. Tony Evers delivered his second State of the State address on January 22, 2020 at the State Capitol in Madison, Wis. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Rabbi Hannah Wallick of the Milwaukee Jewish Federation offers a prayer before Gov. Tony Evers delivered his second State of the State address on Jan. 22, 2020 at the State Capitol in Madison, Wis. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Legislators listen as Rabbi Hannah Wallick of the Milwaukee Jewish Federation offers a prayer before Gov. Tony Evers delivered his State of the State address on Jan. 22, 2020 at the State Capitol in Madison, Wis. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes is seen before Gov. Tony Evers delivered his second State of the State address on Jan. 22, 2020 at the State Capitol in Madison, Wis. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Marlon WhiteEagle, president of the Ho-Chunk Nation, receives recognition before Gov. Tony Evers’ State of the State address on Jan. 22, 2020 at the State Capitol in Madison, Wis. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Gov. Tony Evers gives his second State of the State address at the State Capitol on Jan. 22, 2020 in Madison, Wis. He addressed a joint meeting of the Assembly and the Senate. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
From left: Speaker Pro Tem Rep. Tyler August, R-Lake Geneva, Assembly Speaker Robin Vos, R-Rochester, and President of the Senate Roger Roth, R-Appleton are seen during Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers’ second State of the State address on Jan. 22, 2020 at the State Capitol in Madison, Wis. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Gov. Tony Evers gives his second State of the State address in Madison, Wis., at the State Capitol on Jan. 22, 2020. Here, many members of the Legislature clap. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Assembly Minority Leader Gordon Hintz, D-Oshkosh, claps during Gov. Tony Evers’ second State of the State address on Jan. 22, 2020 at the State Capitol in Madison, Wis. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Members of the UW Marching Band perform in the Assembly Chambers after Gov. Tony Evers’ State of the State Address on Jan. 20, 2020 in Madison, Wis. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
A member of the UW Marching Band plays the cymbals in the Assembly Chambers after Gov. Tony Evers’ State of the State Address on Jan. 20, 2020 in Madison, Wis. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Sen. Patrick Testin, R-Stevens Point, left, talks with Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald, R-Juneau, after Gov. Tony Evers’ second State of the State address on Jan. 22, 2020 at the State Capitol in Madison, Wis. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Second from left, State Treasurer Sarah Godlewski and Sen. Chris Larson, D-Milwaukee, talk with Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Dallet after Gov. Tony Evers’ second State of the State address on Jan. 22, 2020 at the State Capitol in Madison, Wis. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch

The nonprofit Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism (wisconsinwatch.org) collaborates with Wisconsin Public Radio, PBS Wisconsin, other news media and the UW-Madison School of Journalism and Mass Communication. All works created, published, posted or disseminated by the Center do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of UW-Madison or any of its affiliates.

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Coburn Dukehart joined the Center in 2016 as digital and multimedia director. Her role includes directing the Center’s visual strategy, creating visual and audio content, managing digital assets and training student and professional journalists.

Dukehart previously was a senior photo editor at National Geographic, the picture and multimedia editor at NPR, a photo editor at USATODAY.com and washingtonpost.com, interned in the White House photo department, and worked for a London-based publishing group. She has received awards from the National Press Photographers Association, Pictures of the Year International and the White House News Photographers Association. Her multimedia and photography work has been honored with a Webby, a Gracie, a Murrow, a duPont, and Milwaukee Press Club awards, and she was nominated for a national Emmy. Dukehart received a bachelor’s degree in journalism and English from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She holds a master’s degree in photojournalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia.