Marigeli Roman lies down with her son Adriel, 2, and husband, Erick Gamboa, while watching a movie in their Milwaukee home on February 8. Erick Gamboa spent six months in immigration detention which was a major hardship on the family. Says Roman: It moves your world in so many ways: emotionally, mentally, physically, financially. Related story: Stuck in detention: For immigrants without lawyers, justice is hard to find Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch

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This year Wisconsin Watch reporters traveled around the state to investigate some of the most important issues affecting our communities.

Among the stories we published this year, we examined what would happen if Wisconsin were to legalize marijuana, covered the status of rural hospitals, reflected on the lasting legacy of clergy sexual abuse, interviewed homeowners who lost their homes to make way for the Foxconn project, and covered proposed wind and solar projects that stirred up emotions in local communities.

For every story we investigate, we commit ourselves to fair and accurate reporting, as well as creating meaningful, impactful photojournalism that helps to elevate the storytelling and bring our reporting to life.

Here’s a look at some of our most compelling documentary work and portraiture from 2019.

Lena Stojiljkovic, a University of Wisconsin-Madison student, is seen in her friend’s apartment in Madison, Wis., April 10. In the fall of 2016, she was hospitalized for a psychotic break and diagnosed with bipolar I disorder. She says she was delusional, psychotic and had no grasp on reality. Stojiljkovic said she believes smoking marijuana helped trigger the psychosis. Related story: What’s the matter with marijuana? For some people, it’s dangerous Credit: Emily Hamer / Wisconsin Watch
Madison, Wis., resident Gary Storck inhales marijuana from a vaporizer in his apartment on March 20. Storck favors Gov. Tony Evers proposals to legalize cannabis for medical use and to decriminalize possession of small amounts of the drug. Related story: Marijuana advocates have hope but face hurdles as Wisconsin eyes legalization Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Linda Bender, attended a Jefferson Township board meeting Feb. 28, to discuss a wind project that could come to the Wisconsin town. Around 10 people spoke in opposition to the project, while two were in support. Bender, a resident of Juda, says there is “no evidence” that wind turbines cause health detriments. Related story: Proposal for 24 wind turbines whips up controversy in rural Wisconsin Credit: Emily Hamer / Wisconsin Watch
Kim Mahoney’s house on Prairie View Drive in Mount Pleasant, Wis., is the only house still standing in her subdivision, out of an original 13 properties. All other property owners sold to the village of Mount Pleasant and their homes have been demolished to make way for the Foxconn plant. A building on the Foxconn site and the Foxconn construction area are seen in the background. Photo taken on July 1. Related story: Property owners near Foxconn say they were misled. Now their homes are gone. Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
A mother from an Amish community in Brodhead, Wis., watches as her 12-year-old daughter receives an exam at the Fowler Memorial Free Dental Clinic in Monroe, Wis., on Sept. 24. The mother had brought five of her children to the clinic, which provides free care to qualified children up to age 15 in Green and Lafayette counties. Related story: How one small Wisconsin hospital was saved amid a statewide rural health crisis Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Family physician Dr. Bert Hodous works at Mayo Clinic Health Systems clinic in Arcadia, Wis. He used to work at the Arcadia hospital, and says when it closed “it was the saddest day of my life.” He helped design the new clinic, which serves a wide variety of patients in the rural area, including the area’s Hispanic population. “I am so proud of this facility,” he says. “It’s clear to the patients that they are top notch.” Photo taken Sept. 19. Related story: How one small Wisconsin hospital was saved amid a statewide rural health crisis Credit: Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch
Abbie Testaberg and her husband Jody Testaberg are seen on their hemp farm, Kinni Hemp Co., in River Falls, Wis., April 18. Here, their sons Ari, 6, left, and Aki, 8, show frozen hemp that was harvested last season and is now being stored in a freezer. Related story: Wisconsin’s new hemp industry blooms; will marijuana be far behind? Credit: Emily Hamer / Wisconsin Watch
Ted Lausche, a survivor of physical and sexual abuse at a Catholic orphanage in Louisiana, is seen on the porch of his house in Marshall, Wis., on July 3. Lausche says he still suffers from the trauma of childhood abuse. Related story: Catholic clergy abuse survivor traces rocky path from abuse to action Credit: Alisa Ivanitskaya / Wisconsin Watch
Tony Evers shares a kiss with his wife Kathy after being sworn in as Wisconsin’s governor during the inauguration ceremony at the Wisconsin State Capitol on Jan. 7. Credit: Emily Hamer / Wisconsin Watch

Coburn Dukehart

Coburn Dukehart is the digital and multimedia director for the Center. Her role includes directing its visual strategy, creating visual and audio content, managing digital assets and training student and professional journalists. Dukehart has a master's degree in photojournalism from the University of Missouri, and has previously worked as a senior photo editor at National Geographic and NPR. Her multimedia work has been honored with a Webby, a Gracie, a Murrow and duPont awards, and she was nominated for a national Emmy. She specializes in documentary storytelling and visual reporting, and is a member of the National Press Photographers Association and Investigative Reporters and Editors. She is based in Madison, Wisconsin. She can be reached at cdukehart@wisconsinwatch.org