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A gentle reminder to students in the UW-Madison School of Journalism and Mass Communication: Friday is the deadline to apply for a summer internship at the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism.

Applications are due by 5 p.m.

The nonprofit Center is seeking three reporting interns for the summer.

Eligibility is limited to undergraduate and graduate students who are enrolled, at the time of application, in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, where the Center is based.

Pay is $10 an hour. This is a 40-hour-per-week position. The schedule is flexible.

Also, the Center is able to provide paid freelance experience to a limited number of students.  If a student has a good idea (print or visual), we’d like to hear.

Interns receive intensive training and experience in interviewing, researching and writing.

They work with Center staff and partners at Wisconsin Public Radio and Wisconsin Public Television to produce investigative reports.

Interns also collaborate with mainstream and ethnic media outlets around Wisconsin in investigative coverage. Some travel around Wisconsin may be required. Access to a vehicle is required.

Interns are provided office space in Vilas Communication Hall.

In-depth, investigative and computer-assisted reporting skills are preferred. Web, audio and video skills are desirable.

Reports are distributed on WisconsinWatch.org, the Center’s Web site; public radio and television; and by news organizations around the state.

Applicants must submit the following in electronic form to ahall@wisconsinwatch.org:

  • One-page letter describing why they’re qualified for the job.
  • Resume including work and journalistic experience, awards, GPA and at least two references.
  • Up to five examples of published or broadcast work.

Questions may be directed to Andy Hall, the Center’s executive director, at ahall@wisconsinwatch.org, 608-262-3642, or in the Center’s office, 5006 Vilas Communication Hall.

The Center strives to increase the quality and amount of investigative reporting across Wisconsin and to create a replicable, collaborative model for local investigative journalism. The Center is guided by its mission statement: Protect the vulnerable. Expose wrongdoing. Seek solutions. It focuses upon government integrity and quality of life issues of importance to the people of Wisconsin, including the environment, justice system, education, economic issues, health and public safety.

The nonprofit Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism (www.WisconsinWatch.org) collaborates with Wisconsin Public Radio, Wisconsin Public Television, other news media and the UW-Madison School of Journalism and Mass Communication. All works created, published, posted or disseminated by the Center do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of UW-Madison or any of its affiliates.

Republish our articles for free, online or in print, under a Creative Commons license.

Andy Hall / Wisconsin Watch

Andy Hall, a co-founder of the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism and a former Investigative Reporters and Editors board member, won dozens of awards for his reporting in 26 years at the Wisconsin State Journal and The Arizona Republic. Since the Center’s launch in 2009, he has been responsible for the Center’s journalistic and financial operations.

Hall began his career in 1982 as a copyboy at The New York Times. At The Republic, Hall helped break the “Keating Five” scandal involving Sen. John McCain. At the State Journal, Hall’s stories held government and the powerful accountable and protected the vulnerable through coverage that addressed the racial achievement gap in public schools and helped spark the creation of the nationally noted Schools of Hope volunteer tutoring program, revealed NCAA violations by University of Wisconsin athletes, and exposed appalling conditions in neglected neighborhoods such as Allied Drive and Worthington Park. Hall won a first-place award in 2008 for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association. He also has received National Headliner, Gerald Loeb, James K. Batten and Inland Press Association awards for investigative, financial, deadline and civic journalism coverage. Hall has served as a mentor to the staff of La Comunidad, a Spanish-language newspaper in Madison, and has taught numerous courses at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Journalism & Mass Communication. He serves on the Wisconsin Freedom of Information Council Board of Directors, Iowa Center for Public Affairs Journalism Board of Directors, and Indiana University Media School’s Journalism Alumni Board, of which he is president. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Indiana University and, in 2016, received a Distinguished Alumni Award from the IU Media School. He also serves as a member of the Institute for Nonprofit News membership task force to create and uphold high industry standards.