Recent Stories

WisconsinWeekly: Road salt peppers our lakes, Broken Whistle, wetlands, oil and CWD

That road salt goes somewhere — and that’s the problem
Welcome to the fourth edition of our selective weekly roundup of top news stories we think Wisconsin residents, or people who care about the state, need to know about. Of note as we head into road salt season in Wisconsin and other frigid states: Hilary Dugan, assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Limnology, is lead author of a North American lakes study highlighted by Ensia, an independent, nonprofit magazine. The disquieting findings: About 7,700 lakes in the Great Lakes and Northeast regions may be experiencing elevated chloride levels because of road salt runoff, posing questions about the futures of drinking water, fisheries, recreation, irrigation, and aquatic habitat. Who produces WisconsinWeekly? Andy and Dee J. Hall, a couple who founded the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism.

A look at Wisconsin’s ‘hate’ groups

The Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks “hate” groups nationwide, has identified nine such groups operating in Wisconsin. It defines these groups as having “beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics.”

WisconsinWeekly: New whistleblower law, doxxing of white supremacists, TripAdvisor’s removal of tourism warnings and more

New whistleblower law, doxxing of white supremacists, TripAdvisor’s removal of tourism warnings and more
Welcome to the third edition of our selective weekly roundup of top news stories we think Wisconsin residents, or people who care about the state, need to know about. WisconsinWeekly is produced by us, Andy and Dee J. Hall, a couple who founded the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism. Andy is the executive director and Dee is the managing editor. Of note in this week’s roundup: The Washington Post reports on a bill named after Chris Kirkpatrick, a Veterans Administration whistleblower and psychologist who took his own life after he faced retaliation for reporting problems at the Tomah medical center. If you’re already subscribed to our WisconsinWatch newsletter, then you’ll automatically be signed up (with the option to opt-out at any time).

‘Qui tam’: The citizens’ sword

Civil lawsuits such as the one brought by former Attorney General Peg Lautenschlager are known as “qui tam” cases. The word is taken from a Latin phrase that means, “He who brings the action for the king as well as himself.”