Funding

The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism is an independent nonprofit, nonpartisan 501(c)(3) organization that is primarily funded through grants from foundations and donations from individuals and corporations. Additional revenue is obtained through sponsorships of its events and activities, and from earned income — payments for providing services such as fact-checking, collaborating with students or producing […]

Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism Board of Directors

A nationally acclaimed board of directors, including experts in investigative journalism, nonprofit journalism and nonprofit financial management, determines policies, while day-to-day operations are handled by the staff. Individuals’ affiliations are listed for identification purposes only. Board Officers Gene Purcell, board chair Gene Purcell is Director of Wisconsin Public Media at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, overseeing […]

Posted inWisWatch Blog

Three years after investigation, Obama signs campus sexual assault bill

President Obama signed the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act today, as part of the Violence Against Women Act. It’s been three years since the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism published an investigation that found sexual assaults remain seriously underreported and many women still face barriers to notifying authorities at University of Wisconsin campuses.

Posted inMoney & Politics Column

Recusal an issue in high court race

Marquette University law professor Ed Fallone, Roggensack’s challenger in the April 2 election, is seeking to make recusal an issue in this campaign. He says Roggensack “bears a large part of the responsibility for pushing through” a 2010 change in court rules stating that mere receipt of campaign contributions or endorsements can never in itself require recusal.

Posted inOpen recordsWisWatch Blog

Don’t hike cost of public records

A ruling last year by the Wisconsin Supreme Court involving the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel became the focus of attention Feb. 27, when a state Assembly committee held a public hearing on a bill, AB 26, that would drastically increase the cost of obtaining public records. The bill, if approved, would let custodians of public records charge a fee for redacting sensitive information.