Allen Hanson, 75, lived at the state veterans home in Union Grove for nearly four years and said the care became terrible. Hanson moved out of the home last fall because of the issues and now lives in an assisted living facility in Milwaukee. (Ebony Cox/ Milwaukee Journal Sentinel) Ebony Cox / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
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Vulnerable veterans; Ho-Chunk economy; Dane County racial climate scrutinized; wrongful convictions; post-pardon hurdles

Of note: This week we highlight a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel investigation into conditions at a Union Grove veterans home that put the health of veterans at risk. Reporters John Diedrich and Daphne Chen found “a pattern of violations at the Union Grove home over the past five years, making the Wisconsin facility one of the most troubled state-run veterans homes in the nation.”

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Allen Hanson, 75, lived at the state veterans home in Union Grove for nearly four years and said the care became terrible. Hanson moved out of the home last fall because of the issues and now lives in an assisted living facility in Milwaukee. (Ebony Cox/ Milwaukee Journal Sentinel) Ebony Cox / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

‘No one should receive this kind of care’: Lack of water. Medication mistakes. Abuse allegations.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel — May 23, 2022

Family members, residents and volunteers at the Union Grove home for veterans described to the Journal Sentinel how a once-solid facility has tumbled into frequent disarray with sometimes dangerous conditions and a staff burned out from forced overtime and constant churn.

Dan Brown, left, executive manager at Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison and former Ho-Chunk Nation vice president, discusses ideas for diversifying the tribe’s economy on May 12, 2022, in Black River Falls, Wis. (Ilana Bar-av for Wisconsin Watch)

Calls for more transparency, entrepreneurship as Ho-Chunk Nation envisions an economy beyond gaming

Wisconsin Watch — June 1, 2022

The Ho-Chunk Nation has a bright economic future, ripe with prospects to diversify its economy beyond gaming. That’s if the tribal government more clearly communicates with citizens and opens space for entrepreneurs and private companies to invest in tribal communities, Ho-Chunk officials and citizens said.

Previously from Wisconsin Watch: ‘We’ve got to get gaming out of our blood’: Pandemic shock pushes Wisconsin tribes to diversify economy

His clients were acquitted of murder. Why did they get life sentences?

The Atlantic — May 27, 2022

After being wrongfully convicted of rape at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater at age 17 and imprisoned for nearly 10 years, Jarrett Adams has become a powerful defense attorney.

Since she was pardoned by Gov. Tony Evers more than a year ago, Syreeta Robinson, 40, said she was able to get a job as a probation officer — a position she was previously denied, likely because of a crime she committed in her early 20s. (John Hart/ Wisconsin State Journal)

They were pardoned for their crimes, but some still face hurdles

Wisconsin State Journal — May 29, 2022

Gov. Tony Evers has pardoned nearly 500 people, the most pardons of any Wisconsin governor in at least 40 years. While many have gotten new opportunities since their pardons, others have found a sometimes decades-old conviction is still a hurdle.

Also from the Wisconsin State Journal: There is a way to erase a criminal conviction, but it’s hard to do in Wisconsin

Joe Parisi calls for outside review of racial climate in Dane County workplaces

Wisconsin State Journal — June 1, 2022

Dane County Executive Joe Parisi wants an outside assessment of the racial climate within Dane County’s workforce as complaints continue to mount in the media and the County Board plans to vote on their own investigation later this week.

Previously from Wisconsin Watch: ‘Toxic work environment’ in Dane County Medical Examiner’s Office pushes employees to the brink

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