A sand plant by the numbers

[mappress]
 

Main Story:
Frac sand boom creates thousands of jobs
Interactive Map:
2012 Frac Sand Facilities in Wisconsin

The EOG Resources sand processing plant in Chippewa Falls is currently the largest such facility in North America. Here’s the EOG plant, by the numbers:
$65 million
Assessed value of the facility
78,000
Tons of storage capacity for finished sand
62,888
Yards of concrete used in construction
18,000
Gallons of fresh water used daily (90 percent recycled)
950
Covered rail cars for shipping sand
100
Truck drivers moving sand
50
Number of train cars filled daily
1.8
Miles of covered conveyor belts Continue Reading

Frac sand boom creates thousands of jobs

From bottom right, a conveyor carries sand from the crushing area to a wash plant tower to be washed and sorted by grain size at the Preferred Sands plant in Blair, Wis., on June 20, 2012.

Currently, there are no official employment numbers for the state’s rapidly expanding frac sand industry. But the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, using job-site estimates developed by the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation, found that when existing mines and those being built are fully operating, the industry will employ about 2,780 people — a sizeable number given the state’s overall luckluster job picture. Continue Reading

State manufacturers have jobs, need workers

The number of manufacturing jobs in Wisconsin had fallen in recent years, from nearly 600,000 in 1998 to just over 450,000 today. But manufacturing still accounts for about 16 percent of all state jobs. And in the past year, it has begun to rebound. Continue Reading

Wisconsin frac sand sites double

An overview of the 400-acre plot of Preferred Sands mine in Blair, Wis., in Trempealeau County on June 20, 2012.

Frac sand fever has hit much of west-central Wisconsin, catching residents and local governments by surprise when demand for sand suddenly soared and permit applications began to pour in. The number of Wisconsin frac sand mining operations has more than doubled in the past year. Continue Reading