Candles with names attached, at a Dec. 30 memorial in Milwaukee for victims of gun violence there.

Profiles in carnage

This story is the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism’s first report for Precious Lives, a newly launched two-year project investigating the problem of gun violence among young people, its causes, and potential solutions in the Milwaukee area and statewide. Read more about the project. Main story
Bullets exacted terrible toll on children, African Americans A Center analysis found that African Americans were more than 30 times as likely as non-Hispanic whites to be murdered by guns in Wisconsin last year. James A. Witt: In January, police asked to check on the well-being of this 60-year-old resident in the village of Summit in Waukesha County found his body wrapped in a blanket; he had died from a gunshot wound. His son Shawn Witt was charged with first-degree intentional homicide and possession of heroin. Continue Reading

Gov. Scott Walker

Gov. Scott Walker noncommittal on right-to-work, firm on no pardons

And on a presidential run: “I don’t think people should just run particularly for office as high as that because it’s the next logical step or it’s part of adding a career, in this case in politics,” Walker said in an end-of-year interview. “I think it’s something you should feel like you’re actually called, that there’s a purpose, there’s a reason for doing it.”

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About 100 milligrams of nails are all that's needed to show if someone has been heavily drinking — at least six binges in the past three months.

Wisconsin first to test repeat drunken drivers with alcohol biomarkers

In the past several years, a handful of Wisconsin counties became the first nationwide to test repeat drunken drivers for molecular evidence of heavy drinking in nail or blood samples. Researchers say their initial data show that biomarker testing during treatment may help these offenders stay sober longer, keep them from getting rearrested, save counties money — and make roads safer. Continue Reading

Andrew MacGillis, 42, currently in prison for his seventh drunken driving offense said he has not been offered treatment at Fox Lake Correctional Institute. He was sent there before receiving an alcohol and drug assessment. Others choose not to get an assessment and many continue to drive for months after an arrest without facing penalties or receiving treatment. Photo Sept. 19, 2014.

Treatment eludes many drunken driving offenders

“This time, I’m confident, I’m willing, I’m able and I want the sobriety,” says Andrew MacGillis, currently in Fox Lake Correctional Institution on his seventh drunken driving offense. But treatment may prove elusive for MacGillis, who says he has not been offered rehabilitation programs at Fox Lake. Others face a delay or are found noncompliant with court-ordered interviews that qualify them for treatment. Continue Reading